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Culture Emission

"You are what you love, not what loves you." -Adaptation About me: I enjoy items on México, photography, anthropology, world cultures, healing, the physical sciences, airplanes, cars, inspirational people, and silly and creative things. Have a wonderful day! free counters
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mediamattersforamerica:

A Veteran Describes How The Right-Wing Media’s Misogyny Comes At A High Cost For The U.S. Military

During my time in the Air Force in the early 2000s, I remember regularly seeing Fox on the TV at work and hearing Limbaugh’s angry rants blasting from the radio. Now imagine being a woman in this atmosphere in the last few years, when Limbaugh repeatedly labeled Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” and Fox hosts referred to a female pilot as “boobs on the ground” and suggested she “couldn’t park” her jet. Add that to the fact that many of these shows are aired on bases around the world using taxpayer money, and the situation quickly becomes too much to stomach … 
Now put the right wing’s misogynistic messaging into the context of rampant sexual assault in the military, with an estimated 26,000 incidents in 2012, and it creates one very ugly picture. The normalization of the sexual objectification of women, which is actively encouraged by conservative media figures, only makes it more difficult for women in the military to fight the well-documented “invisible war.” If one has the ability to reduce women to mere objects to be used for amusement, what’s to stop them from hitting or raping a fellow service member, particularly if he thinks that he will face little punishment for his actions?
Fox host Eric Bolling may have apologized for his remarks, but that doesn’t erase his participation in the disturbing right-wing trend of encouraging the deep-seated culture of misogyny in the military. This was far from an isolated incident. If conservative media outlets truly want to “support the troops,” then they will change the way they talk about women, in the military or otherwise. Given how many women currently serve our country, it’s more important than ever to truly appreciate their contributions to the defense of our country if we hope to maintain a fully functioning, unified military force that’s capable of handling serious threats to our national security.

Read the full story here.

mediamattersforamerica:

A Veteran Describes How The Right-Wing Media’s Misogyny Comes At A High Cost For The U.S. Military

During my time in the Air Force in the early 2000s, I remember regularly seeing Fox on the TV at work and hearing Limbaugh’s angry rants blasting from the radio. Now imagine being a woman in this atmosphere in the last few years, when Limbaugh repeatedly labeled Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” and Fox hosts referred to a female pilot as “boobs on the ground” and suggested she “couldn’t park” her jet. Add that to the fact that many of these shows are aired on bases around the world using taxpayer money, and the situation quickly becomes too much to stomach … 

Now put the right wing’s misogynistic messaging into the context of rampant sexual assault in the military, with an estimated 26,000 incidents in 2012, and it creates one very ugly picture. The normalization of the sexual objectification of women, which is actively encouraged by conservative media figures, only makes it more difficult for women in the military to fight the well-documented “invisible war.” If one has the ability to reduce women to mere objects to be used for amusement, what’s to stop them from hitting or raping a fellow service member, particularly if he thinks that he will face little punishment for his actions?

Fox host Eric Bolling may have apologized for his remarks, but that doesn’t erase his participation in the disturbing right-wing trend of encouraging the deep-seated culture of misogyny in the military. This was far from an isolated incident. If conservative media outlets truly want to “support the troops,” then they will change the way they talk about women, in the military or otherwise. Given how many women currently serve our country, it’s more important than ever to truly appreciate their contributions to the defense of our country if we hope to maintain a fully functioning, unified military force that’s capable of handling serious threats to our national security.

Read the full story here.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

nubbsgalore:

taipei glows under a blanket fog in these photos by wang wei zheng. (see also: dubai)

offside-goal:

chrc:

ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:

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I WAS REALLY SAD BECAUSE I THOUGHT THEY’D MISSED BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG BUT THEN THERE IT IS OH MY GOSH YOU’RE SUCH A CUTIE!!!!!

THIS IS MY FAVOURITE POST EVER NOTHING WILL TOP THIS THIS IS PERFECT I AM IN TEARS

PUPPIES

(via farewellsaysthemelancholyboy)

neuromorphogenesis:

UNDERSTANDING THE PHENOMENON OF SYNESTHESIA

The number 3 is color orange and January is moody, according to synesthetes. They are blessed with the natural ability, thought to be passed on by genes, of a blending of senses, in which the brain’s sensory centers remain connected on two levels.

by MEZZMER

(via laboratoryequipment)

b-binaohan:

(via The Racial Gap On Global Warming | FiveThirtyEight)

Given the talk about the need for diversity in the global warming movement, you might expect that the people who say fighting global warming should a top priority would be overwhelmingly white. You’d be wrong…Every time the question has been asked, a lower percentage of whites have said it should be a top priority than non-whites. In fact, the gap between whites and non-whites has widened. The share of non-whites viewing climate change as a top priority hasn’t changed much; that same share of whites, meanwhile, has dropped more than 10 percentage points.

see? this is what i am talking about when i say that white ppl are responsible for ruining the environment. they are also the ones with actual power to change things, but they don’t.
i’m pretty sure that poc care more about climate change than white ppl bc many of us have family living in areas starting to be seriously impacted by it (like the PH).
OR
as is also the case, that poor poc and Indigenous people are also the ones who bear the burden of environmental damage in the US (and canada).

b-binaohan:

(via The Racial Gap On Global Warming | FiveThirtyEight)

Given the talk about the need for diversity in the global warming movement, you might expect that the people who say fighting global warming should a top priority would be overwhelmingly white. You’d be wrong…Every time the question has been asked, a lower percentage of whites have said it should be a top priority than non-whites. In fact, the gap between whites and non-whites has widened. The share of non-whites viewing climate change as a top priority hasn’t changed much; that same share of whites, meanwhile, has dropped more than 10 percentage points.

see? this is what i am talking about when i say that white ppl are responsible for ruining the environment. they are also the ones with actual power to change things, but they don’t.

i’m pretty sure that poc care more about climate change than white ppl bc many of us have family living in areas starting to be seriously impacted by it (like the PH).

OR

as is also the case, that poor poc and Indigenous people are also the ones who bear the burden of environmental damage in the US (and canada).

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

White high school dropouts are wealthier than black or Latino college graduates

(Source: jessehimself, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

minazarei:


asperatus cloud x

IT’S LIKE WATCHING THE WAVES ABOVE YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN

minazarei:

asperatus cloud x

IT’S LIKE WATCHING THE WAVES ABOVE YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN

(Source: dilfgod, via dontswallowbillmurray)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via krupaloops)

All of Leslie’s compliments to Ann

(Source: adumbscotts, via parksandburgers)

pinkmnss:

Get to Know Me Meme - [1/16] favorite female characters

Tina Belcher » ”Dad, if you believe you’re beautiful, you will be. I did.”

(via dontswallowbillmurray)

huffingtonpost:

Are Nasty Comments Like These Keeping Women Out Of Science?

"It’s death by a thousand cuts. Every day you’re faced with some comment, some snide remark, some inability to get a name on a research paper. And with an accumulation of those experiences, women tend to walk with their feet."

Go here to read more infuriating stories about women in science. 

(via gender-and-science)

joethought:

I’ve posted an annoying amount about India’s Mars mission already, but.

Just letting everyone know: This. really. happened.

(via krupaloops)

nubbsgalore:

starting on september 25, hindus will observe ten days of ceremonies, rituals, fasts and feasts in honor of the supreme mother goddess, durga, and her defeat of the demon mahishasura. hinduism, it should be noted, is the only religion in the world which has emphasised to such an extent the motherhood of god.

the first nine days of festivities, known as navarātrī (literally meaning nine nights), see thousands of youth participate in the garba dance to honour durga. (garba is itself a word that derives from womb, or life, and the dance is meant to honor the fact that all humans have the divine energy within them.)

girls and women dress in the traditional  garga choli, a three piece dress comprised of a colourful blouse, a long, embroidered skirt, and a shall known as a dupatta. photos are by amit dave and sam panthaky from ahmedabad, in the northern indian state of gujarat, where the garba dance originated.

(via krupaloops)