»

Culture Emission

"You are what you love, not what loves you." -Adaptation About me: I enjoy items on México, photography, anthropology, world cultures, healing, the physical sciences, airplanes, cars, inspirational people, and silly and creative things. Have a wonderful day! free counters
Free counters

Home Archive RSS Ask
beyondvictoriana:

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:


The name “Half and Halves” is derived from the same term used to describe Punjabi-Mexican individuals, typically offspring of Punjabi fathers and Mexican mothers. In the early 1900s, several hundred Punjabis immigrated as farmers to central California and came in contact with the communities of Mexican laborers. In addition to the commonality of family values, spicy-hot food, and zesty song and dance, what drew these communities together was that they were uniformly discriminated against by white society. Legislature forbidding Punjabi men from bringing wives from India and anti-miscegenation laws, which prohibited whites from marrying brown or black people, seeded familial liaisons between Punjabis and Mexicans. Not understanding what race these individuals belonged to, county clerks would simply write “brown” on marriage certificates for Punjabis and Mexicans, and thus began the integration of these two communites.

read more about the punjabi-mexican community here and here.

 Beyond Victoriana also has an article about this community here: http://beyondvictoriana.com/2011/05/24/the-sikh-pioneers-of-north-america-the-punjabi-mexican-americans-of-california/

beyondvictoriana:

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

The name “Half and Halves” is derived from the same term used to describe Punjabi-Mexican individuals, typically offspring of Punjabi fathers and Mexican mothers. In the early 1900s, several hundred Punjabis immigrated as farmers to central California and came in contact with the communities of Mexican laborers. In addition to the commonality of family values, spicy-hot food, and zesty song and dance, what drew these communities together was that they were uniformly discriminated against by white society. Legislature forbidding Punjabi men from bringing wives from India and anti-miscegenation laws, which prohibited whites from marrying brown or black people, seeded familial liaisons between Punjabis and Mexicans. Not understanding what race these individuals belonged to, county clerks would simply write “brown” on marriage certificates for Punjabis and Mexicans, and thus began the integration of these two communites.

read more about the punjabi-mexican community here and here.

Beyond Victoriana also has an article about this community here:
http://beyondvictoriana.com/2011/05/24/the-sikh-pioneers-of-north-america-the-punjabi-mexican-americans-of-california/

(via fylatinamericanhistory)

doctorswithoutborders:

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

doctorswithoutborders:

Today is World TB Day. Sign our TB Manifesto and help us demand better medicines and diagnostics for people with drug-resistant forms of the deadly disease: http://ow.ly/uN7mW 

(via krupaloops)

fuckyeahbostonterriers:

Happy Paddy’s Day from Andy.

fuckyeahbostonterriers:

Happy Paddy’s Day from Andy.

Anxiety is not rude. Depression is not selfish. Schizophrenia is not wrong. Eating disorders are not a choice. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is not crazy. Mental illness isn’t self-centred, anymore than cancer is self-centred. It’s a medical illness.

from89:

Flower Mandalas by Kathy Klein

You Can Also Find Me -:

Skumar’s :- Twitter | Facebook | We Heart It | Pinterest | Subscribe

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

(via dontswallowbillmurray)

theolduvaigorge:

"What we are facing is a time when genomic knowledge widens and gene engineering will be possible and widespread," said Nina Jablonski, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology. “We must constantly monitor how this information on human gene diversity is used and interpreted. Any belief system that seeks to separate people on the basis of genetic endowment or different physical or intellectual features is simply inadmissible in human society.”

What worries Jablonski and the sociologists, psychologists and evolutionary biologists in her session at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, today (Feb. 14) in Chicago, are people who believe that they can use genetic traits to describe races and to develop race-specific interventions for each group. One particularly disturbing approach, although currently suggested as beneficial, is application of genetics to create special approaches to education. The idea that certain individuals and groups learn differently due to their genetic makeup, and so need specialized educational programs could be the first step in a slippery slope to recreating a new brand of “separate but equal.”

Similar approaches in medicine that are based not on personal genetics but on racial generalizations can be just as incorrect and troubling, especially because human genetic admixture is so prevalent. ”Our species is defined by regular admixture of peoples and ideas over millennia,” said Jablonski. “To come up with new reasons for segregating people is hideous.”

Classification of humans began innocently enough with Carl Linnaeus and Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, who simply classified humans into races in the same way they classified dogs or cats — by their physical characteristics. These were scientists classifying the world around them and realizing that the classifications were not immutable but had a great deal of diversity and overlap. However, in the last quarter of the 18th century, philosophers, especially Immanuel Kant, looked to classify people by behavior and culture as well as genetics. Kant suggested that there were four groups of people, three of which because they existed under conditions not conducive to great intellect or achievement were inferior. Only the European race was capable of self-improvement and highest level of civilization” (read more).

(Source: Penn State News; top image: Fay Flam Writer)

(via krupaloops)

How to Charge an iPod with fruits

superkrupaninja:

the-science-llama:

Direct Imaging of Atomic Bonds Before & After Reaction

For the first time, scientists have visually captured a molecule at single-atom resolution in the act of rearranging its bonds.

To do this, the researchers used atomic force microscopy to measure the charge distribution around the molecules. The microscope (with a very fine edge) would be repelled more in certain areas from the different charges and because bonds are essentially the sharing of electrons, allowed them to visualize the atoms themselves as well as the molecular bonds. Awesome!
Published May 30, 2013 // Science // Berkeley LabVia Wired

This is so striking

superkrupaninja:

the-science-llama:

Direct Imaging of Atomic Bonds Before & After Reaction

For the first time, scientists have visually captured a molecule at single-atom resolution in the act of rearranging its bonds.

To do this, the researchers used atomic force microscopy to measure the charge distribution around the molecules. The microscope (with a very fine edge) would be repelled more in certain areas from the different charges and because bonds are essentially the sharing of electrons, allowed them to visualize the atoms themselves as well as the molecular bonds. Awesome!

Published May 30, 2013 // Science // Berkeley Lab
Via Wired

This is so striking

(via krupaloops)

The GOP’s immigration problem
8bitfuture:

‘Metapaper’ blocks Wi-Fi signals.
French researchers have developed a wallpaper able to block Wi-Fi signals, while still allowing FM radio waves and emergency frequencies to pass through. Known as metapaper, it is able to filter out 99% of all waves coming from the outside.
Possible uses could include creating quiet spaces inside movie theaters or hospitals, or for the ultra paranoid it could be used to stop the neighbors stealing your Wi-Fi or hacking into a wireless home network.
The snowflake patterned wallpaper can be covered with traditional wallpaper. The makers are pushing it as a ‘healthy alternative’, citing studies showing that overexposure to electromagnetic waves could cause adverse health affects.

8bitfuture:

‘Metapaper’ blocks Wi-Fi signals.

French researchers have developed a wallpaper able to block Wi-Fi signals, while still allowing FM radio waves and emergency frequencies to pass through. Known as metapaper, it is able to filter out 99% of all waves coming from the outside.

Possible uses could include creating quiet spaces inside movie theaters or hospitals, or for the ultra paranoid it could be used to stop the neighbors stealing your Wi-Fi or hacking into a wireless home network.

The snowflake patterned wallpaper can be covered with traditional wallpaper. The makers are pushing it as a ‘healthy alternative’, citing studies showing that overexposure to electromagnetic waves could cause adverse health affects.

(Source: CNN, via 8bitfuture)